Nerdpod: Wide Receivers, part 2

Here’s a look at more receivers and their stat values, pupule math style, from the 2015 season.

See Part 1 here

I’m sure there are a lot more WRs (and TEs) worth looking at. But this is what I’ve got, along with a list of all WRs by value points per game.


Jaymin Sarono KPO
9g 60-686, 5 TD (76.2 ypg)
¥158.6 / ¥17.6 pg
$ +25
¥$183.6 / ¥$20.4 pg

Kamakana Ching KON
13g 32-630, 11 TD (48.5 ypg)
¥161.0 / ¥12.4 pg
$ +5
¥$166.0 / ¥$12.8

Blaise Manabe RAD
10g 33-480, 7 TD
¥123.0 / ¥12.3 pg
$ +5
¥$128.0 / ¥$12.8 pg
(does not include 2 rush TD, 1 pass TD)

Keanu Momoa NAN
8g 40-602, 6 TD
¥136.2 / ¥17.0 pg
$ +5
¥$141.2 / ¥$17.7 pg

Thomas Reid RAD
11g 25-536, 7 TD
¥120.6 / ¥11.0 pg
$ +5
¥$125.6 / ¥$11.4 pg

Kame Kim Choy-Keb-Ah Lo AIEA
8g 35-537, 8 TD
¥136.7 / ¥17.1 pg
$ +20
¥$156.7 / ¥$19.6 pg

Isaiah Freeney WAIN
9g 23-611, 6 TD
¥120.1 / 13.4 pg
$ +30
¥$150.1 / ¥$16.7 pg

Tyreek Keough LEI
7g 39-522, 6 TD
¥127.2 / ¥18.2 pg
$ +20
¥$147.2 / ¥$21.0 pg

Bryson Ventura MIL
10g 36-733, 10 TD (73.3 ypg)
¥169.3 / ¥16.9 pg
$ +35
¥$204.3 /¥$20.4 pg

Taje Akaka BAL
8g 29-379, 4 TD (47.4 ypg)
¥90.9 / ¥11.4 pg
$ +5
¥$95.9 / ¥$12.0 pg

Eamon Brady PUN
8g 36-602, 5 TD (78.3 ypg)
¥120.2 / ¥15.1 pg
$ +30
¥$150.2 / ¥$18.4 pg

Clifford Cunningham NAN
8g 31-454, 6 TD
¥112.4 / ¥14.1 pg
$ +10
¥$122.4 / ¥$15.3 pg


Shayne Teruya ROOS
7g 52-641, 9 TD (91.6 ypg)
¥170.1 / ¥24.3 pg
$ +5
¥$175.1 / ¥$25.0 pg

Nick Kennedy IOL
9g 52-527, 1 TD (58.6 ypg)
¥110.7 / ¥12.3 pg
$ +35
¥$145.7 / ¥$16.2 pg

Andrew Neves KAIM
10g 29-477, 5 TD
¥106.8 / 10.7 pg
$ +10
¥$116.8 / ¥$11.7 pg

If we go by value points per game, this is what the list looks like. I’ll probably add more receivers to this later.

REC
¥$
¥ production + $ strength of schedule (PS) value (avg per game)

name avg
1. Noa 33.3
2. Timoteo 30.9
3. McGoldrick 27.8
4. Makekau 23.7
5. Williams 22.4
6. Simanu 22.2
7. Esprecion 21.9
8. Takeyama 21.6
9. Sarono 20.4
10. Tigilau 20.3
11. Moses-Sanchez 18.9
12. Kobayashi 16.8
also
Teruya 25.0
Keough 21.0
Ventura 20.4
Kim Choy-Keb-Ah Lo 19.6
Brady 18.4
Momoa 17.7
Freeney 16.7
Kennedy 16.2
Cunningham 15.3
Ching 12.8
Manabe 12.8
Akaka 12.0
Neves 11.7
Reid 11.4

* Keough played just 7 games; Teruya played just 7 games
** Formula 1) accounts for Strength of Schedule (Top 10 opponents) and 2) does not account for weaker Division II opponents

name total (games)
1. Timoteo 371.0 (12g)
2. Noa 300.0 (9g)
3. Williams 224.1 (10g)
4. McGoldrick 222.0 (8g)
5. Esprecion 218.9 (10g)
6. Takeyama 216.1 (10g)
7. Moses-Sanchez 207.4 (11g)
8. Ventura 204.3 (10g)
9. Tigilau 202.6 (10g)
10. Makekau 189.7 (8g)
11. Sarono 183.6 (9g)
12. Simanu 177.9 (8g)

Teruya 175.1 (7g)
Kobayashi 167.6 (10g)
Ching 166.0 (13g)
Kim Choy-Keb-Ah Lo 156.7 (8g)
Brady 150.2 (8g)
Freeney 150.1 (9g)
Keough 147.2 (7g)
Kennedy 145.7 (9g)
Momoa 141.2 (8g)
Manabe 128.0 (10g)
Reid 125.6 (11g)
Cunningham 122.4 (8g)
Neves 116.8 (10g)
Akaka 95.9 (8g)

All in all, it’s a measuring stick of numbers, not necessarily quality of receiver. All the intangible factors, like an offense that doesn’t air it out much, or the aforementioned skills like blocking and route-running, don’t factor in here. Nor the ability of a WR to get open no matter how good the competition.

Timoteo gets open and/or makes catches on everybody. He’s that big and that fast and that physical and that reliable. Noa isn’t as big or physical, but he had a sensational season that was largely hidden because Kamehameha is in the ILH, and their games weren’t televised and seen by the masses.

On the whole, it was another superb season for pass catchers. Maybe not quite as deep as in previous years, but the number of quality receivers remains high. That’s a tribute to the work ethic of these players and the teaching of their coaches. Football in general at the prep level in Hawaii has largely moved on from the “pure” four-wide, run-and-shoot era, but the elements of that philosophy are still a big part of successful offenses that have evolved to adapt the read option.


But of all the skill positions, it’s the WR who is most dependent on others — the QB and O-line — to have success as an individual. That’s why this has been fun, and yet skewed. Football is about winning championships and some of the players listed (or not) will have productive college careers, more so than they did in high school. Maybe their high school team ran a lot and relied on defense (Radford). Maybe their team completely abandoned the aerial attack (Kahuku). Maybe their team simply had so much WR talent that the ball was distributed across the board. But for every Timoteo or Noa or Esprecion, there’s a Teruya at a smaller program who ekes out quite a niche.

Same with the golden one, McGoldrick. ‘Nuff said.

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