King of the road: Kahuku is No. 1 for sixth week in a row

Kahuku’s Brock Fonoimoana took opening kickoff and ran it back 75 yards for a touchdown against Waianae on Saturday. Kahuku advanced to the OIA Open Division title game with a 33-7 win at Farrington's Skippa Diaz Stadium. Craig T. Kojima/ckojima@staradvertiser.com.

Kahuku collected 10 first-place votes to remain atop the Star-Advertiser Football Top 10 on Monday.

Saint Louis received the remaining two first-place votes from a panel of coaches and media.

Kahuku is 7-0 after a 33-7 playoff win over Waianae and has been at the top of the poll for six weeks in a row. Every game has been away due to renovations to Carleton Weimer Field on the Kahuku campus.


The rankings remain status quo with no changes. Konawaena, which arrived at No. 10 last week, came the closest to losing its spot, but survived a threat from Hilo with a 13-12 win in the BIIF D-I title game.

Kahuku will meet No. 3 Mililani for the OIA Open Division title on Friday. No. 5 Campbell and No. 9 Waianae will battle on Saturday for third place with a state-tournament berth on the line.

Star-Advertiser Football Top 10
Dec, 6, 2021

Rank School (first-place votes) points last week’s ranking
1. Kahuku (10) (7-0, 7-0 OIA Open) 118 1
> def. No. 9 Waianae 33-7
> next: vs. Mililani, Friday

2. Saint Louis (2) (5-3, 2-2 ILH Open) 110 2
> bye
> next: bye

3. Mililani (5-1, 5-1 OIA Open) 93 3
> def. No. 5 Campbell 42-7
> next: vs. Kahuku, Friday


4. Kamehameha (3-3, 3-1 ILH Open) 79 4

5. Campbell (4-3, 4-3 OIA Open) 63 5
> lost Mililani 42-7
> vs. Waianae, Saturday

6. ‘Iolani (9-0, 5-0 ILH D-I/D-II) 55 6
> bye
> next: bye

7. Punahou (1-4, 1-4 ILH Open) 53 7

8. Lahainaluna (6-0, 6-0 MIL) 34 8
> def. Baldwin 29-22
> bye

9. Waianae (3-4, 3-4 OIA Open) 25 9
> lost to No. 1 Kahuku 33-7
> next: vs. Campbell, Saturday


10. Konawaena (6-0, 6-0 BIIF) 14 10
> def. Hilo 13-12

Also receiving votes: Moanalua 7, Kapaa 4, Kaiser 1, Kapolei 1, Roosevelt 1.

COMMENTS

  1. ilh December 6, 2021 3:05 pm

    The only team in the OIA open division is Kahuku, the rest should be Division 1. And it looks like Kahuku will face Mililani in the opening round of the State Tournament on top of that, , in 2019, #1 played #3 and #2 played #4, so should be the same again this year. Let’s see if they will change it back to #1 plays #4, and #2 plays #3.


  2. Eddie K December 6, 2021 4:42 pm

    No ILH. St.louus needs to play all the relevant teams. Cmon, you think St.louus like play Waianae in the first game? They always want to play the best, not the 10th rank team, geez louuese.


  3. 88 December 6, 2021 6:19 pm

    @eddie this years St. Louis team is different.. They’re trying to avoid playing Mililani at all cost..😂


  4. Honest December 6, 2021 8:49 pm

    Lets Be Honest! Kahuku is ranked 1st, so that St. Louis can be second and play third place team Mililani. The fourth place team will play Kahuku. The OIA planned it that way. They are deathly afraid of two blowout wins by St. Louis. They may even bring back Jim Beaver to wear a white hat and be the head referee at the Championship Game. The OIA needs help. Honest!


  5. Recruited not Rooted December 6, 2021 10:15 pm

    @88 You don’t really believe the things you’re saying on the these message boards do you? If so, you should really stop driving around alone in your car with your mask on all day. This is clearly depriving your brain of much needed oxygen to keep those few brain cells you have left alive. “Mililani will mop the floor with the crusaders” and “They’re trying to avoid playing Mililani at all cost” smh! Scrimmages, WTF, LOL! I can’t wait until the 18th. Looking forward to your excuses.


  6. Oia Fan December 6, 2021 10:52 pm

    @Honest, In my opinion I think St Louis is only ranked second because they have 2 losses on there name. Even if they we’re ranked 1st, they would still play the loser of the oia championship game and the oia champion plays the winner of the 3rd place game. It has been that format ever since they created the open-division. Lets just anticipate and be excited to see a highly talented offense in St Louis vs a highly talented defense in Kahuku in these coming weeks.


  7. 96730to89 December 6, 2021 10:56 pm

    C’mon Mililani. Let’s play a clean game this time. Those foolish plays destroyed any chance you had in your first meeting with Kahuku.


  8. 88 December 7, 2021 11:59 am

    Have you ever been to a Mililani or a St. Louis scrimmage? Probably not, because if you had you would know what I’m talking about. These teams treat scrimmages as if it were a real game. The starters play majority of the game there are refs and the score is kept. ILH was probably at the scrimmage and saw with her own eyes what happened. That’s why she keeps posting that Kahuku will play Mililani for a 3rd time even though the rest of us knows that won’t happen.


  9. Recruited not Rooted December 7, 2021 3:53 pm

    @88 Yes, I’ve been to every Saint Louis scrimmage the last few years and no they don’t treat scrimmages like real games. QB1 played only 25% of snaps in the spring scrimmages and 33% snaps in the summer scrimmage. Other position groups had similar percentage of snap breakdowns. Those are the facts. Idk what real game you’d do that in, but just goes to show you don’t know anything about football. And nobody got dominated but, then again, I wouldn’t expect STL 2’s and 3’s to dominate Mililani’s 1’s. You should really get your intel from somebody else or get better glasses. BTW there is no way the corrupt OIA would allow Kahuku and Mililani to play in the semis and let STL walk through to the finals. Just another example of you not knowing the obvious. That’s the whole reason STL played #3 Mililani in 2019 and not #4 Campbell. Any other state has 1 play 4 and 2 play 3. Then again, any other state would have Kam in there over an awful 3rd place OIA team.


  10. 88 December 7, 2021 6:18 pm

    Ummmm Kahuku played Campbell because Kahuku was the OIA Champion. The ILH Champion plays the 2nd place OIA team. Its always been like that in this 4 team format. If St. Louis was ranked #1 this year they still would play the 2nd place OIA team. Aaaaand they still would get destroyed by Mililani like they did earlier this year. You aint gotta make stuff up to try and be right.


  11. ilh December 7, 2021 8:21 pm

    Scrimmages don’t count, that’s how you find players who will start, everyone plays, standings is only on REAL games, Mililani going no where again this year, 2019, #1 Saint Louis Played #3 Mililani, so this year will be the same which would be #1 Kahuku vs. #3 Mililani and #2 Saint Louis playing #4 Waianae/Campbell winner. in 2019 Saint Louis was #1 seed but tournament committee did not want Saint Louis to play #4 seed, that is why 2019 was different from other years, so let’s see now what will they do, Crusaders are well rested and ready to Roll.


  12. ilh December 7, 2021 8:23 pm

    88, Do your home work before talking, go check the 2019 State Tournament brackets.


  13. 88 December 8, 2021 12:28 am

    Daaaaamn your dumb…


  14. ??? December 8, 2021 1:34 am

    I really hope the Akana kid plays for Kahuku his senior year. Hawai’i HS fans would love to see if all his hype is well deserved?


  15. ILoveHawaii December 8, 2021 8:57 am

    LOL.

    Hooooo. Not the ” you dumb” action.

    What a great rebuttal.


  16. Fan of OIA Football December 8, 2021 9:13 am

    Anyway you look at the State Playoffs, it’s going to be great and hopefully the best team in the State wins without the aid and assistance of the Referees. Best Wishes to All!


  17. Good Story December 8, 2021 9:39 am

    Mililani don’t even have to win to burst this ILH bubble. The hype right now from that side is that the OIA sucks and any team from the ILH would mop the floor with us. So if Mililani even keeps it interesting, and I am one to believe they are more than capable of that, let’s see how these ILH elitists explain that one.


  18. 88 December 8, 2021 10:05 am

    I don’t know how else to explain that the ILH champion always plays the #2 OIA team in the State football playoff tournament. There was a year when Punahou, the ILH #2 was slated to play Kahuku, the OIA champ, but they got spanked by the OIA #4 Kapolei. Your two girlfriends need to go back to St. Louis High School and ask for their money back cause they some dumb@$$’s if they still can’t comprehend


  19. HailFromDaNorth December 8, 2021 10:16 am

    Telling you guys either Kahuku or Mililani can come up with the dub against Saint Louis. Would love to see an all OIA state championship played! That would be something!


  20. ILoveHawaii December 8, 2021 11:14 am

    Went on HHSAA site and……….. nothing.
    Why is that?

    Why arent the brackets already finalized with regards to seeding?

    ILH 1 has a bracket
    OIA 1 has a bracket

    How do you determine the match ups from this point on? and Why?
    Brings up a great point.

    Why would the ILH #1 have to play the OIA #2?
    This would make an easier path for OIA#1 playing the OIA#3.

    I would like to hear the logic for this seeding process.

    Btw, are you referring to me as one of the two girlfriends??


  21. 2ndstring December 8, 2021 11:23 am

    Just glad to see Kahuku back where they belong. It was tough to see them lose the way they did in 2019 to Saint Louis. Quitting in a game that was ugly during the regular season 0-28 by halftime. Then I really thought the ship was gonna be competitive like all the previous state championships have been. But another spanking 6-45. That’s a combined 6-73 in 6 quarters. Red Raiders gotta win this year by 35 plus to earn back that respect! Saints are definitely down this year.


  22. Good Story December 8, 2021 2:11 pm

    @I Love Hawaii

    Because that would mean that State Semifinals would be just a revenge game for OIA 2 after losing the OIA Championship game. Do we really wanna see the same teams play 2 weeks in a row? I think not.


  23. Pakelika December 8, 2021 7:39 pm

    Does anyone have any ideas for why Kahuku made one OIA championship game appearance in the years 1973 to 1988, and then many more than that in the years since. And after making their first prep bowl appearance in 1989, and appearing four more times in that game, they never won. What happened that Kahuku has been much more successful since the years following 1988, and especially from 2000 to the present? Did it have anything to do with BYU-Hawaii and the Polynesian Cultural Center attracting more families or athletes and keeping them in the Koolauloa district?


  24. ILoveHawaii December 9, 2021 10:15 am

    GS – I would like to see a fair and equitable selection process for everyone involved.

    I wish one of the NI teams would step up and enter the Open division.
    What teams do you think would have chance?

    Maybe, having the 3rd place OIA team play the #2 ILH team for the 4th spot in the state tournament?
    That way we recreate the old PREP Bowl? LOL.

    Oh yeah, Mr. 2nd string, please dont ever mention the 28-0 RR’s QUITTING/SASA at half-time ever again.
    You have been put on…………..Red Notice.


  25. Good Story December 9, 2021 10:33 am

    I personally would love to see another ILH team enter the states and one less OIA…but alas, I’m just a keyboard warrior.


  26. Upset Alumnist December 9, 2021 11:47 am

    Not sure why Kamehameha ranked #4. Could not close out the ILH this year. Doesn’t matter you won 2 against the Lou. Matters when you win it all. Looks like the Lou was “built for this” again in the ILH.


  27. OG RRFL! December 9, 2021 8:45 pm

    some people just can’t handle kahuku ever being successful. homegrown talent. homegrown kids. everyone playing for their community. rooted not recruited. and all the kahuku haters and ILH moneybags people buying championships praying for our downfall and attacking red raider faithful here. so sad. we’ll see what you have to say when big red wins states this year over an overrated lulu squad.


  28. ILoveHawaii December 10, 2021 11:01 am

    OG-
    So, you hating on your own community kids and Ohana that have or are presently attending Private School?


  29. KHS '04 December 10, 2021 12:20 pm

    @ Pakelika – I think it’s a combination of things, but it’s definitely hard work, determination, and talent.

    As a kid growing up on the North Shore in the 90’s, we always witnessed St. Louis winning the prep bowl every year and I know for myself, and many others, it was tiring to see that. A couple years we lost by a few points, and in ’96 we got robbed, straight up. Going to football games and watching our older brothers/cousins come out on the losing end just wasn’t a nice feeling.

    So for our generation, growing up, we knew we had the talent to compete with St. Louis because of where we came from and the last name we represented, but we also wanted to be at the top. Plain and simple. It’s a mentality that we adopted and that we got accustomed to after winning it all for the first time.

    In ’99 after we won our first prep bowl, it brought a sense of pride to the community, like we finally got to the top of the mountain, and it’s been a trickling effect ever since.

    Add in the pep rallies, cheer fest, and the festivities that take place during homecoming week, and it’s a special thing for us.

    Our children, along with our entire community, love Kahuku anything, especially football. It’s a way of life. There are those who move in to the community and we welcome them with open arms (just don’t get kurazy lol) and there are those who leave for whatever reason, but still call the North Shore home.

    It’s a special thing to us to be a Red Raider 4 Life. One I know I am very proud of.


  30. KHS '04 December 10, 2021 12:33 pm

    @Pakelika – Kalamai, our first football title was in 2000


  31. Pakelika December 11, 2021 11:43 am

    KHS ‘04 Mahalo for your reply! So you are too young to know from a first hand perspective what is or are the reason or reasons for the dramatic difference in the frequency of championship contention and success of the Kahuku football program between the era from 1973 to 1988, and the years since then, especially from 2000 to the present; if there is a reason, or reasons. I suspect that there may be a reason, just by considering the frequency of OIA championships from 1989 to the present. Was there a significant increase in the quantity of talented players, and/or the quality? Was there a change in the attitude of the players in the program? The OIA was founded in 1940. In the first five decades of it’s existence, Kahuku was no more than an occasional champion, and a contender in a few other years. Waipahu, Waialua, Kailua, and Waianae were leading contenders and the prevailing teams of those decades. Something more, I suspect, than simply effort and talent, was involved. Maybe the demographics of those other areas changed, along with that of the Koolauloa district, and brought about the present inequity in the balance of power among OIA football programs. If one were to read between the lines of your reply, it might be that the players of previous years before 1989 were not as talented in terms of quantity-at least-if not quality, or didn’t work as much or as hard, or did not care as much as players of more recent years. This is relative, comparing different eras, not necessarily saying that players of pre1989 at Kahuku didn’t care or didn’t work hard or were not talented. This might be a ripe subject for doing research and a graduate level sociological dissertation-Kahuku High School Football, Pre & Post 1989: What Accounts For The Dramatic Difference In The Program’s Success? Also, you mentioned being robbed in 1996; Kahuku didn’t play in the Prep Bowl in 1996, Waianae did. If you meant 1995, that is relative to your perspective, there was also a call that went against SL, or there was no call when there should have been. It would be very difficult-if not impossible-to attribute any teams loss in the Prep Bowl, or in the HHSAA tournament championship game to being “robbed” due to the action or inaction of the game officials. Your other incorrect statement, that Kahuku won the Prep Bowl in 1999, was later corrected by you, but you didn’t say that Kahuku never did win a Prep Bowl, and that by the time Kahuku did win its match against the ILH champions in 2000, it was no longer the Prep Bowl, it was the HHSAA tournament final round.


  32. KHS '04 December 11, 2021 4:55 pm

    @ Pakelika – You’re very welcome!

    You had quoted:

    “So you are too young to know from a first hand perspective what is or are the reason or reasons for the dramatic difference in the frequency of championship contention and success of the Kahuku football program between the era from 1973 to 1988, and the years since then, especially from 2000 to the present; if there is a reason, or reasons.”

    I did graduate from Kahuku in ’04, so the latter part of your statement, I did answer in the beginning of my original post to you where we were tired of seeing St. Louis always winning. We knew we had the talent to compete with them and win, and that’s what we did starting in 2000.

    You went on to say:

    “The OIA was founded in 1940. In the first five decades of it’s existence, Kahuku was no more than an occasional champion, and a contender in a few other years. Waipahu, Waialua, Kailua, and Waianae were leading contenders and the prevailing teams of those decades.”

    Kahuku (’43, ’44, and ’47) and Waipahu (’46, ’48, and ’49), each won 3 titles in the 40’s to lead in that decade. Waipahu’s coach (Mits Fujishige) for those title years started off at Kahuku when they won in ’43. Waipahu (still with Fujishige) and Waialua won 4 titles in the 50’s. From ’56-’72 Kahuku went on to win 4 more titles, under Harold Silva in the 50’s and Famika Anae in ’69 and ’72.

    Kailua’s only titles during this time frame was a 3 peat from ’63-’65. Waipahu’s title count was at 7, and Waialua’s title count was at 6. Kahuku’s title count was at 7. So your quoted statement above was incorrect as well because Kahuku was tied for the lead for OIA titles at that point.

    From ’73-’88 it was pure domination from Waianae where they racked up majority of their OIA titles, 10 to be exact until Kahuku won again in ’89. Waianae would go on to win 4 more titles in the 90’s while Kahuku would begin to rekindle it’s glory of the past, winning 5 titles in the ’90’s.

    You also mentioned:

    “If one were to read between the lines of your reply, it might be that the players of previous years before 1989 were not as talented in terms of quantity-at least-if not quality, or didn’t work as much or as hard, or did not care as much as players of more recent years.”

    So this would be your own personal opinion on this matter at hand. But you were also incorrect with this statement as you were in the quoted statement before this one because again, Kahuku up until ’72, was tied for the lead for OIA titles at 7, with Waipahu. Now if you stated players before ’89 but after ’72, then you would be correct. I can’t say why Kahuku wasn’t good between ’73 and ’88, but I’m also not going to take away the fact that Waianae football completely dominated those years as well.

    Towards the end of your response you mentioned:

    “Also, you mentioned being robbed in 1996; Kahuku didn’t play in the Prep Bowl in 1996, Waianae did. If you meant 1995, that is relative to your perspective, there was also a call that went against SL, or there was no call when there should have been. It would be very difficult-if not impossible-to attribute any teams loss in the Prep Bowl, or in the HHSAA tournament championship game to being “robbed” due to the action or inaction of the game officials.”

    That is correct, I keep forgetting football and graduation are not in the same year. However, I did have a couple cousins who graduated in ’96 that did tell me we got jipped in that game, and that is just a perspecitve, as you mentioned. But it is what it is. So yes, you were correct in that we did go to the title game in ’95 against St. Louis.

    Your final statement was:

    “Your other incorrect statement, that Kahuku won the Prep Bowl in 1999, was later corrected by you, but you didn’t say that Kahuku never did win a Prep Bowl, and that by the time Kahuku did win its match against the ILH champions in 2000, it was no longer the Prep Bowl, it was the HHSAA tournament final round.”

    I did correct myself with the year that we did win, and I also didn’t include prep bowl in the sentence that I corrected because it was a State Championship that we won.

    So from 2000 onward, we’ve built something special, just like what the Waianae’s of the late 70’s and 80’s did or the St. Louis’s of the late 80’s and 90’s did as well. And what it comes down to is the talent and the athletes that do come out of OUR community. There are many household names in our community, who generations after generations, have established Kahuku football and has made it what it is today.


  33. Pakelika December 12, 2021 3:10 pm

    KHS ‘04 Being “tired” of another team winning annually in a championship like setting (Prep Bowl) is not a reason that explains Kahuku’s success in HHSAA title games from 2000 and forward, neither is realizing that a team has the talent to compete and win “and that’s what we did.” There is nothing in those two statements that clearly explains the program’s success from 2000 on, in terms of a direct connection between what you stated and winning titles. You replied, but have no answer that is convincing and compelling, to the question what accounts for the success of the Kahuku football program after 1989-especially from 2000 to the present, in comparison to pre 1989. Nothing you cited in an effort to disqualify the assertion that Kahuku was no more than an occasional champion before 1989, disqualifies that assertion from being correct. A single occurrence of consecutive championships in one decade and a total of three championships in that decade, followed by four titles in twenty-three seasons certainly qualifies as an occasional champion; it strains the bounds of credibility-to put it mildly- to deny that, and assert otherwise, and conclude that Kahuku was anything more than an occasional champion. You are fixated on the fact that Kahuku was tied for the number of titles won up to 1972, as if being tied for the number of titles won disqualifies the assertion that Kahuku was no more than an occasional champion from being correct, it does not; the key and determining factor in determining whether the assertion is correct or not is the frequency of titles with in a period of time, not being in a tie for number of titles won after thirty-three seasons, only 7 championships in 33 seasons certainly qualifies as being only an occasional champion.


  34. Pakelika December 12, 2021 4:24 pm

    KHS ‘04 When you stated that Kahuku was tied for the number of OIA titles won after winning it’s seventh in 1972, did you account for Waipahu’s championship the season before?


  35. KHS '04 December 13, 2021 5:08 am

    @ Pakelika – “A single occurrence of consecutive championships in one decade and a total of three championships in that decade, followed by four titles in twenty-three seasons certainly qualifies as an occasional champion; it strains the bounds of credibility-to put it mildly- to deny that, and assert otherwise, and conclude that Kahuku was anything more than an occasional champion.”

    “Waipahu, Waialua, Kailua, and Waianae were leading contenders and the prevailing teams of those decades.”

    So your initial response is incorrect to begin with because Kahuku and Waipahu were both, as you put it, “leading contenders and prevailing teams” in the 40’s. That right there alone, discredits your claim of your second post that you quoted, in this response to you. Which clearly tells me and signifies your disdain or dislike of Kahuku football because you fail to realize that and or give credit to where it is due.

    Another thing that tells me of your antipathy for Kahuku football is the fact that you list Kailua as one of the “leading contenders and prevailing teams” of the first 5 decades of OIA football. However, they were only dominant from ’63-’65. No titles in the ’40’s or ’50’s, or ’70’s, ’80’s, and ’90’s. Kahuku won a title in each decade, and Kailua is one of the “leading contenders and prevailing teams” for those decades?

    That logic is very telling of your stance on things. It’s okay though, keep enjoying the history in the making that Kahuku football provides for you, including number 28, of OIA Championships.


  36. Pakelika December 15, 2021 5:38 pm

    KHS ‘04 No, it is absolutely not incorrect to assert that that Kahuku, pre 1989, was nothing more than an occasional champion, not a perennial one. Waialua, Waipahu, Kailua, Waianae were leading contenders, even in seasons when they were not league champions. Your opinion that anything asserted about Kahuku pre 1989 is incorrect is opinion in personem. You consider that a mere 7 league championships in 33 seasons qualifies Kahuku as being more than an occasional champion. That is an average of a championship for every 4-5 seasons, easily disqualifying your attempt to portray Kahuku as anything more than an occasional champion. I understand that Kahuku does not enjoy an enviable academic reputation, so your attempt to falsely portray its football program as something which it demonstrably is not is an understandable effort, vain and self indulgent though it is.


  37. Pakelika December 15, 2021 5:54 pm

    KHS ‘04 No, it is absolutely not incorrect to assert that that Kahuku, pre 1989, was nothing more than an occasional champion, not a perennial one. Waialua, Waipahu, Kailua, Waianae were leading contenders, even in seasons when they were not league champions. Your opinion that anything asserted about Kahuku pre 1989 is incorrect is opinion in personem. You consider that a mere 7 league championships in 33 seasons qualifies Kahuku as being more than an occasional champion. That is an average of a championship for every 4-5 seasons, easily disqualifying your attempt to portray Kahuku as anything more than an occasional champion. I understand that Kahuku does not enjoy an enviable academic reputation, so your attempt to falsely portray its football program as something which it demonstrably is not is an understandable effort, vain and self illusory though it is. Kailua was a multiple time league finalist in the 70’s and a multi season playoff participant in the 80’s, they were league runner up and represented their league in the first runner up game of the Prep Bowl in 1987 and played in that game again in 1991. They were legitimately perennial contenders and among the leading teams in their league.


  38. Pakelika December 15, 2021 6:16 pm

    The only thing that the Kahuku Football Team provides folks like me is to play the same role in HHSAA tournament games that the Washington Generals played for the Harlem Globetrotters.


  39. Pakelika December 15, 2021 6:27 pm

    The only thing that the Kahuku Football Team provides for folks like me is to play the same role, in HHSAA tournament games, that the Washington Generals played for the Harlem Globetrotters. They provide and serve no other purpose; what you stated in your conclusionary sentence is strictly of value, if there is any, to folks like you.


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